Monthly Archives: September 2009

The Reluctant Case against a Founder’s Visa

Berin Szoka links to this article by Brad Feld promoting Paul Graham’s idea for a founder’s visa. Under this proposal, there’d be a special route for immigrating to the United States for foreigners who found startup firms. Berin makes the … Continue reading

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Google Book Search vs. the Separation of Powers

Over at Cato’s blog, I make the case against the impending Google Book Search Deal.

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Bending the Cost Curve on Health Care

Brian Moore has been doing a fantastic job over at my previous blog, and his latest post on the doctor shortage is particularly good. Brian and I are both married to doctors who are currently suffering through residency, so we … Continue reading

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Thomas Friedman: Top-Down Thinker

I haven’t been able to take anything Thomas Friedman writes seriously since reading Matt Taibbi devastating takedown of his 2005 book, The World is Flat. As Taibbi puts it, “Friedman is such a genius of literary incompetence that even his … Continue reading

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The Problem with “Fair Information Practices” on the Web

One of the reasons I think EFF made a mistake in endorsing new privacy regulations is that I think there’s a huge gap between the sensible-sounding rhetoric of privacy legislation propposals and the details of what’s actually being proposed. The … Continue reading

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Privacy Trade-offs and the Importance of Experimentation

Over at my previous blogging home, Adam Marcus has a good post enumerating some of the advantages of behavioral advertising: The problem is that, even if online video services can sell ad time for 3 times as much as broadcasters, … Continue reading

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Hobbies Don’t Need “Incentives for Participation”

Ars Technica writes up law professor Eric Goldman’s argument that Wikipedia is doomed. Since 2005, Goldman has been predicting that Wikipedia would start to decline by 2010, and to his credit (I guess) he has stuck by his prediction despite … Continue reading

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Nathan Myhrvold: Bottom-Up Thinker?

Earlier this year, Princeton’s alumni magazine did a glowing profile (I’m guessing all of their profiles are glowing) of Nathan Myhrvold. I learned that he and I have several things in common. Like me, he was once a grad student … Continue reading

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Nathan Myhrvold’s Evil Genius

Last year I wrote that Intellectual Ventures is a kind of reductio ad absurdum of our flawed patent system. It’s a firm that literally does nothing useful, its only business is the acquisition and licensing of patents. Not only does … Continue reading

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Bottom-Up Thinking about Google’s Card Catalog

My Advisor, Ed Felten, has a post examining the problem of metadata errors in Google’s Book Search catalog: Some of the errors are pretty amusing, including Dickens writing books before he was born, a Bob Dylan biography published in the … Continue reading

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